Tuesday 15th

The main dragonfly species were seen on New Downs in scorching temperatures. There were 39 Migrant Hawkers, 42 Common Darters, and 16 Ruddy Darters.

Monday 14th

Another Red-veined Darter was disturbed from long grass on the Estate. Presumably they’re local progeny emerging from ponds nearby to mature in the grass safely.

Friday 11th

A bit of late news to announce. Last year Vagrant Emperor was not our only new Odonata to be found. Late summer we were fortunate to come across a colony Dainty Damselflies on a private area. This year we confirmed they were still present and doing very well. Hopefully next year we can arrange access for members to see this rare species. Click HERE to read more.

Tuesday 8th

Willow Emerald Damselflies have been showing well in the Gullies. Of particular note, were this pair (below) observed ovipositing into a Salix sp. The species is meant to egg lay on branches overhanging water but this is clearly not the case in this example as the Gullies are very dry at the moment. Quite often we find Willow Emerald Damselflies at some distance away from water, especially after dry summers when there is no standing water, and i’ve often wondered just how much water is necessary for their larval development. Can they tolerate dry conditions? If anyone knows more about this do get in touch.

Willow Emerald Damselflies by S.North

Sunday 6th

A Red-veined Darter was on the path outside Middle Field in the early morning sun.

Friday 4th

Although the sun was only out in short spells the day was nice enough to see a few dragonflies out on Worth marshes. Most were Migrant Hawkers with at least 37 seen, plus a few Common Darters, and a single Southern Hawker along a hedgerow near the Great Wood.